Mundelein Surgery Services

At Mundelein Animal Hospital, we adhere to the highest standards of care with all surgical procedures. Check out all that we do to ensure your pet’s safety and well-being on their surgery day.

Our animal hospital has a state-of-the-art surgical suite where our veterinarians perform all common procedures, including:

  • General Soft Tissue Surgery
  • Surgical Tooth Extraction
  • Spay and Neuter
  • Laser Surgical Services
  • Advanced Surgical Services with a Surgical Specialist
Your Pet's Surgery Day

On the day of surgery, one of our highly skilled doctors will first perform a complete examination on your pet. Any pre-operative bloodwork that needs to be performed is then done and your pet is admitted for surgery. They are pre-sedated with an injectable sedative, an IV catheter is placed, and they are given an intravenous injectable anesthetic induction agent.

An endotracheal tube is placed to keep their airway open and to provide oxygen and anesthesia during the procedure. Monitoring equipment is then attached to them and their heart rate, respirations, blood pressure, and EKG are all monitored from start to finish. IV fluids are begun to help maintain your pet’s stability during surgery. Your pet is then shaved and prepped for the surgical procedure.

Once your pet is in surgery, you can feel comfortable knowing that their vital signs will be monitored by one of our trained veterinary surgical technicians utilizing advanced monitoring technology. Visual assessment and recording of vital signs is done throughout the procedure.. The technician is present during the entire surgery and recovery process to maintain the safety and comfort of your pet. Our doctors place the utmost emphasis on pain management, providing appropriate pain medications as needed to ensure your pet is as pain-free as possible. We believe that keeping our patients safe and comfortable before, during and after surgery is of the greatest importance and is an essential component of your pet's care.

Spaying and Neutering

Spaying or neutering your pet can help them live a longer, healthier life, minimizes behavior problems and helps control the population of unwanted pets. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, nearly 12,500 puppies are born in the United States each hour. Spaying or neutering your pet eliminates unwanted litters, which contributes to thousands of euthanasia procedures and millions of stray animals. Did you know that neutering your dog at the right age lowers the chance of them developing various diseases? Speak with your veterinarian to identify the best age for your dog to undergo the procedure.

If you are shopping around for a competitive price on this procedure, be sure to question the type of anesthetic used, the type of pain management provided, and the monitoring equipment and procedures followed. All of our surgery patients have IV catheters placed and receive IV fluids. We use several monitoring devices during your pet’s anesthetic. A veterinary technician continually assesses your pet’s vital signs during the procedure. Although the risk of an anesthetic death in a normal healthy pet is very rare, our monitoring devices and procedures allow us to respond to an anesthetic emergency faster. Faster responses can save lives. Please call or visit our facility to learn more about our neutering procedures.

Your pet’s safety and comfort are our primary concerns when performing a spay or neuter. We use advanced pain management techniques in conjunction with anesthesia to make sure your pet is as comfortable as possible during the procedure and after they are discharged. Our spay and neuter patients receive 2 or 3 different injectable pain medications during the procedure and always go home with oral pain medication. We also perform local anesthetic blocks at the surgical site. Proper pain management makes the procedure as comfortable as possible and allows for faster recovery.

Spaying
Spaying is a surgical procedure in which both ovaries and uterus are completely removed from your female pet. Also called an "ovariohysterectomy", the surgery is performed while your pet is under general anesthesia. There are many benefits to spaying your female companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, spaying will eliminate the sometimes 'messy' heat cycles that attract male dogs to your house from miles away. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as pyometra (infection in the uterus) and mammary cancer. Additionally, research has shown that pets that have been spayed live longer than pets that have not been spayed.

Neutering
Neutering refers to the surgical procedure in which both testicles are removed. There are many benefits to neutering your male companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, neutering can help eliminate undesirable and at times, embarrassing behavior in your male companion. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as prostate disease and testicular cancer.

Declaw

Our top priority is providing the highest-quality of veterinary care to each pet we treat. Every policy and medical procedure supported by our practice has been put in place with the health and wellness of pets in mind.

Our veterinarians perform a surgical onychectomy if they believe that a cat cannot be trained to refrain from using its claws destructively in the home, or poses a danger to family members. Unfortunately, all cats are not amenable to behavior modification and we believe that this surgical procedure will result in fewer cats being abandoned or euthanized. Once declawed, it is recommended that your cat live indoors since the ability to defend itself is compromised. Typically, the optimal age to have your cat declawed is in the younger years, as they tend to recover from surgery with fewer consequences. However, it is important to communicate with your veterinarian and obtain a one-on-one evaluation to discuss the best personal age to declaw your cat to maximize recovery comfort.

We also believe feline onychectomy should be performed only with the medically appropriate use of anesthetics and analgesics and adherence to careful surgical and post-surgical protocols. If you are shopping around for a competitive price on this procedure, be sure to question the type of anesthetic used, the type of pain management provided, and the monitoring equipment and procedures followed. All of our surgery patients have IV catheters placed and receive IV fluids. We use several monitoring devices during your pet’s anesthetic. A veterinary technician continually assesses your pet’s vital signs during the procedure.

Your pet’s safety and comfort are our primary concerns when performing a declaw. We use advanced pain management techniques in conjunction with anesthesia to make sure your pet is as comfortable as possible during the procedure and after they are discharged. Our declaw patients receive 2 or 3 injectable pain medications during the procedure and go home with oral pain medication. We perform nerve blocks of the feet that provide additional pain relief immediately after the surgery. Our declaw patients stay with us overnight so that we can be sure they are comfortable, to remove their bandages in the morning, and to assess the surgical area before going home. It is very common to see these kitties pawing playfully through the kennel door following this surgery.

Surgical FAQs at Mundelein Animal Hospital

Surgical FAQs

What You Need to Know Before Your Pet's Upcoming Surgery

Many people have questions about various aspects of their pet's surgery, and we hope this information will help. Get in touch to learn more about your pet’s surgery.

Is the anesthetic safe for my pet?

Today's modern anesthetic monitors have made surgery much safer than in the past. At our hospital, we do a thorough physical exam on your pet before administering anesthetics, to ensure that a fever or other illness won't be a problem.

Pre-anesthetic blood testing is important in reducing the risk of anesthesia. Blood testing before surgery is recommended to ensure that the liver and kidneys can handle the anesthetic. Even apparently healthy animals can have serious organ system problems that cannot be detected without blood testing. If there is a problem, it is much better to find it before it causes anesthetic or surgical complications. We administer IV fluids to patients during most of our anesthetic procedures. This is a critical part to keep patients well hydrated throughout the procedure and provides us with an emergency access port if the need should arise.

If serious problems are detected, surgery can be postponed until the problem is corrected. For geriatric or ill pets, additional blood tests, electrocardiograms, or x-rays may be required before surgery as well. It is important that surgery be done on an empty stomach to reduce the risk of vomiting during and after anesthesia. You will need to withhold food for at least 8 to 12 hours before surgery.

Anesthetic Safety

Pre-Surgical Bloodwork

Will my pet be in pain?

Anything that causes pain in people can be expected to cause pain in animals. Pets may not show the same symptoms of pain as people do; they usually don't whine or cry, but you can be sure they feel it. Pain medications needed will depend on the surgery performed. We include pain management with every surgical procedure for both the comfort of the patient, and to speed the recovery process. This may involve a postoperative injection which will ensure the patient is comfortable upon waking as well as a restful night's sleep at home.

When deemed necessary by the doctor, medication for the next few days is also included. Major procedures require more pain relief than things like minor lacerations. For dogs, we may recommend an oral anti-inflammatory the day after surgery and several days after to lessen the risk of discomfort and swelling. We use newer medications, which are less likely to cause stomach upset and can be given even the morning of surgery.

The cost of the medication will range depending on the size of your dog. Because cats do not tolerate standard pain medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or Tylenol, we are limited in what we can give them. Recent advances in pain medications have allowed for better pain control in cats than ever before. After surgery, pain medication is given on a case by case basis. Any animal that appears painful will receive additional pain medication.

At no time should you give your pet human medication unless directed by a veterinarian.

Will my pet have stitches?

For some surgeries, we use absorbable sutures underneath the skin. These will dissolve on their own and do not need to be removed later. Some surgeries, especially tumor removals, do require skin stitches. With either type of suture, you will need to keep an eye on the incision for swelling or discharge. Most dogs and cats do not lick excessively or chew at the incision, but this is an occasional problem you will also need to watch for. If there are skin sutures, these will usually be removed 10 to 14 days after surgery. You will also need to limit your pet's activity level for a time and no baths are allowed for the first 10 days after surgery.

What other decisions do I need to make?

While your pet is under anesthesia, it is the ideal time to perform other minor procedures, such as ear cleaning or implanting an identification microchip. If you would like an estimate for these extra services, please call ahead of time. This is especially important if the person dropping the pet off for surgery is not the primary decision maker for the pet's care.

Frequently Asked Questions at Mundelein Animal Hospital